Laynetter at Waimea Bay

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AhiBelly
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Laynetter at Waimea Bay

Post by AhiBelly » Wed Nov 05, 2008 10:24 am

fishing
Young fish taken with gill net at Waimea Bay
A 7 a.m. on Sunday, my brother and several men parked their cars along the highway, above the Waimea Bay jump rock.

They stood in disbelief as four men surrounded a large school of halalu with a three-piece gill net. The net was loaded with fish and they re-laid it around the rest of the school that swam upstream toward Waimea Valley park.

All witnesses started yelling at these men as they quickly took their nets to their parked cars at Waimea Bay Beach Park.

What are the laws regarding this?

To the other people who witnessed this absurdity, please submit your version. According to other sources, this was also done on Saturday, the day before. Auwe!

Eleanor Crisostomo
Kahuku
this letter was in the editorials of today's honolulu advertiser. i know netting akule in the bay is open in november, wether more than one piece of lay net is allowed is where i'm uncertain (still not sure how the person who saw them noticed it was a three piece net from way up on the road) and from watching the pile this past couple weeks i only seen halalu come up, hopefully someone can elaborate if surrounding halalu is allowed... one thing is certain, i seen the pile last week and also this past sunday afternoon, there really was a significant dent in the pile.
"The solution to any problem - work, love, money, whatever - is to go fishing, and the worse the problem, the longer the trip should be."

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Brian F.
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Re: Laynetter at Waimea Bay

Post by Brian F. » Wed Nov 05, 2008 11:19 am

Netting of halalu is allowed from November 1st. A laynet is not usually used and in most cases, halalu and akule are caught with a bag net or surround net technique. The laynet is left unattended for long periods of time and that is why people were concerned that it can catch unintended things. The bag net or surround is never left in the water unattended and it is usually removed within an hour or two.

There is a minimum size to each type of net used in a particular manner (from DLNR):

lay net fishing method with net that has less than 2-3/4" stretched mesh;
surround net fishing method with net that has less than 2-1/2" stretched mesh;
bag net fishing method with net that has less than 1-1/2" stretched mesh.


The 150 foot lengths only apply to laynets and that is why the person observed longer nets and more than one piece. Most people, like the letter writer, don't know the difference.

The person writing the editorial letter also mentioned that they took the whole school over the weekend, yet you noted that the school remained even on Sunday but with a good dent in it. Most commercial Akule/halalu fishermen will not take the whole school, either because it is physically too big or it does not make sense to take too much and have it sell for too little (ie. flood the market). Most guys that have been doing this a long time understand the economics and life cycle of the fish because they are interested in continuing to do this for a long time. Waimea is not the only place halalu are being taken - they are caught statewide so supply is always a big consideration.

The State has indicated that akule/halalu is one of the most steady and productive fisheries (ie. no danger of being overfished) and that is why akule fishermen have done this for so long. The akule/halalu return every year after living out at sea (mesopelagic), with up and down years like all things dependent on weather, currents, etc. Many people have noticed that they do not show up in the harbors and bays as much and attribute that to overfishing. But what people that study these fish, including the commercial fishermen, have noticed is that they still see schools that are huge but they tend to stop at FADS and artificial reefs. These things were never in the ocean but were only introduced roughly in the last 20-30 years. Also in the last 20 years, there are a heck of a lot more near shore ocean recreation activities like jetskis, dolphin and whale watching tours, etc. that to some, disrupt fish patterns and spawning activities.

One friend who whips for halalu every year put it this way: the halalu fishermen had 2-3 months of fishing and have caught their share. Now it is time for the commercial fishermen to make it possible for people that don't fish to have some halalu too.
Aloha,
Brian F.

"No House, No Fish"
"Hypocrisy is not a fault these days - it is a lifestyle"
http://fishtoday.org (the views expressed above are my own and do not specifically represent that of PIFG)

BaitKasta
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Re: Laynetter at Waimea Bay

Post by BaitKasta » Wed Nov 05, 2008 2:44 pm

I was driving by Waimea Bay that Saturday morning and saw the netters in the water. I called DLNR and the guy that answered the phone knew why I was calling. He had already received several calls reporting the netters and said that it was legal to surround net on November 1st. He also added that there was a DLNR person at Waimea Bay observing the netters so I would assume that they were doing everything legally.

AhiBelly
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Re: Laynetter at Waimea Bay

Post by AhiBelly » Thu Nov 06, 2008 11:58 am

what ever happened to Akule Joe, haven't seen him in a while... i used to enjoy watching his crew catch akule/halalu down makua's... william aila had an akule fisherman on his show, it was very informational they talked about what brian mentioned
Most guys that have been doing this a long time understand the economics and life cycle of the fish because they are interested in continuing to do this for a long time. Waimea is not the only place halalu are being taken - they are caught statewide so supply is always a big consideration.
"The solution to any problem - work, love, money, whatever - is to go fishing, and the worse the problem, the longer the trip should be."

— John Gierach

Brian F.
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Re: Laynetter at Waimea Bay

Post by Brian F. » Sun Nov 09, 2008 2:14 pm

It was also pointed out to me:

Under the DAR fishing regs, Waimea has only two months of open season (Nov-Dec) for commercial fishing of hahalalu while the rest of the State has eight (Nov-June). So Pole guys in Waimea have a much longer fishing season than other areas.

In addition, the two fishermen that did the netting operation helped fight to keep Waimea Bay open to both kinds of akule/halalu fishing when the Pupukea MLCD rules were changed to ban fishing several years ago.
Aloha,
Brian F.

"No House, No Fish"
"Hypocrisy is not a fault these days - it is a lifestyle"
http://fishtoday.org (the views expressed above are my own and do not specifically represent that of PIFG)

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Re: Laynetter at Waimea Bay

Post by 808shorecaster » Sun Nov 09, 2008 7:19 pm

Hey brian, any chance that the new dlnr chair will re-open the pupukea mlcd to halalu fishing again? Or will it still be closed to the public and fisherpeople only to benefit businesses and special interest groups like all of the dive tour operators out of sharks cove?

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Re: Laynetter at Waimea Bay

Post by Brian F. » Sun Nov 09, 2008 8:59 pm

Doesn't appear likely. Soon after taking over DLNR, Ms. Thielen was approached about the subject and made aware of fishermen's efforts with the former Chair. They advised her of what the former Chair began to do on the matter until abruptly shelving everything "to concentrate on his re-confirmation". To date, those involved have not received any response or contact from the current Chair or department regarding the issue.

Even though the North Shore Neighborhood Board endorsed opening Pupukea to akule/halalu fishing and even went so far as to issue a recommendation, nothing has been done. The Department, under the last Chair, went to the NSNB saying "we want to hear what the people of the North Shore community want", even though many questioned that process of directly involving the NSNB as being inconsistent with their own policy making. Well, the NSNB stated what they wanted to the shock of the Department - guess it wasn't what they wanted to hear.
Aloha,
Brian F.

"No House, No Fish"
"Hypocrisy is not a fault these days - it is a lifestyle"
http://fishtoday.org (the views expressed above are my own and do not specifically represent that of PIFG)

evbouret
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Re: Laynetter at Waimea Bay

Post by evbouret » Mon Nov 10, 2008 7:40 am

are you guys saying your opposed to the sharks cove conservation area? I dont see from a fisherman's standpoint how it would be a bad thing. It gives the fish a buffer zone to escape the hordes of fisherman. I went diving at sc and there were big omilu everywhere, moi, aholehole, big schools of good sized manini. Once these fish fill up the area the only natural thing to do is branch outwards. What do you hav eopposed?

island driver
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Re: Laynetter at Waimea Bay

Post by island driver » Mon Nov 10, 2008 9:26 am

Personally, I can't stand laynetting. Wiping out an entire colony of fish in just a matter of minutes, even if it's legal. Would it be bad if laynetting for Halalu/Akule was regulated to every other year and between the months of July and October? Not that it would stop the illegal netters, but to allow the fish to flourish abundantly? I dunno, just thinking..... 8)

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Re: Laynetter at Waimea Bay

Post by Brian F. » Mon Nov 10, 2008 12:26 pm

evbouret wrote:are you guys saying your opposed to the sharks cove conservation area?
evbouret, please do a search for "pupukea" and read what has been going on there. In short, fishermen are NOT asking to open up the MLCD to all fishing. They are asking to fish only for akule/halalu from the rocks toward the openings and seaward side. That would include whipping and hand-pole - the usual ways recreational fishing for akule/halalu is done. They are not asking for spearfishing, dunking, thrownetting or any other type of fishing to be allowed again. Fishing for akule/halalu occurs only certain times of the year but, when it was open, it used to be a very good area when the akule/halalu run; the type of fishing is low impact in terms of gear.
I dont see from a fisherman's standpoint how it would be a bad thing.
In case you don't get to the search: it can be a bad thing when commercial recreation businesses are allowed to take up the parking lot and beach space so much so that the North Shore residents object.
Aloha,
Brian F.

"No House, No Fish"
"Hypocrisy is not a fault these days - it is a lifestyle"
http://fishtoday.org (the views expressed above are my own and do not specifically represent that of PIFG)

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Re: Laynetter at Waimea Bay

Post by Brian F. » Mon Nov 10, 2008 12:32 pm

island driver wrote:Personally, I can't stand laynetting. Wiping out an entire colony of fish in just a matter of minutes, even if it's legal. Would it be bad if laynetting for Halalu/Akule was regulated to every other year and between the months of July and October? Not that it would stop the illegal netters, but to allow the fish to flourish abundantly? I dunno, just thinking..... 8)
Island driver, you may be getting the two mixed up again. Most fishermen do not use a laynet for akule/halalu. They do not usually take the whole school either. About letting them rest to flourish:
The State has indicated that akule/halalu is one of the most steady and productive fisheries (ie. no danger of being overfished) and that is why akule fishermen have done this for so long. The akule/halalu return every year after living out at sea (mesopelagic), with up and down years like all things dependent on weather, currents, etc. Many people have noticed that they do not show up in the harbors and bays as much and attribute that to overfishing. But what people that study these fish, including the commercial fishermen, have noticed is that they still see schools that are huge but they tend to stop at FADS and artificial reefs. These things were never in the ocean but were only introduced roughly in the last 20-30 years. Also in the last 20 years, there are a heck of a lot more near shore ocean recreation activities like jetskis, dolphin and whale watching tours, etc. that to some, disrupt fish patterns and spawning activities.
Aloha,
Brian F.

"No House, No Fish"
"Hypocrisy is not a fault these days - it is a lifestyle"
http://fishtoday.org (the views expressed above are my own and do not specifically represent that of PIFG)

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